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Corolla vs. Civic: Which One Should you buy in 2019

NT: Our tester only had to be dark beige–, as compare corolla civic Calls oxide — did not it? Looks are entirely subjective, and however, also the Rolla is the more attractive one. It’s good for 168 horsepower and 151 lb.-ft. Of torque, and it’s hooked up to either a CVT or a six-speed manual.

Corolla vs. Civic: Which One Should you buy in 2019

NT: Our tester only had to be dark beige–, as Toyota Calls oxide — did not it? Looks are entirely subjective, and however, also the Rolla is the more attractive one. It’s good for 168 horsepower and 151 lb.-ft. Of torque, and it’s hooked up to either a CVT or a six-speed manual.

That’s not a bad thing. Combination; the CVT won’t make the engine assault your eardrums with an excessive drone under hard acceleration, and it lets you wring out the engine — which, by the way, is surprisingly peppy and loves to rev. Especially given the output is low compared to the Civic.

The Civic, at least on paper, has the Corolla beaten. Although the Civic only packs a 1.5L four-cylinder engine, it’s turbocharged and rated at 180 horsepower and 162 lb.-ft. Of torque (though if you stick with the manual transmission, you unlock an extra 15 lb.-ft. for 177 total). Like the Corolla, you could spec the Civic with a CVT or a six-speed stick, but like the Corolla, most will get the automatic. You’d think the Civic is the sporty one here considering its pedigree, but it’s more like a luxury car in the way it puts power to the ground.

JY: It’s not just the way it puts the power to the luxurious ground, it also drives like a larger car. It feels like another size up from the Corolla because of its stretched length and more challenging sightlines, but it also has the smooth, refined ride of a larger car, matched with a more relaxed steering calibration. The Corolla takes a different approach and its more upright greenhouse, and rear windscreen and tighter seats make it feel like it is wrapped around you, and the steering responds more sharply to inputs, while the suspension is a tad firmer, though not uncomfortable. The Civic is perfectly competent and handles better than pretty much any crossover of similar size and price, but the Corolla is more playful, especially when you wind up the zingy little engine.

Staying on the point of the Civic feeling more substantial, well, that’s because it is more extensive, over 10 cm long, with a longer wheelbase and more extensive overall, making for a bit more passenger space, but a lot more cargo space, the Corolla offers a tad over 500 liters, while the Civic is over 700 L. Both are, of course, superior to sedans in terms of practicality, the 60-40 split-folding rear seats aiding in that.

While those cargo compartments are smaller than SUVs with the same footprint, there is also an efficiency advantage, the Civic posting 8.5 L/100 km in our time with it, the Corolla not far back with 8.8. Neither was close to their estimated ratings (7.9/6.6/7.3 for the Civic and 7.5/5.8/6.7 for the Corolla, hatch), but this was in the tail end of winter with Enthusiastic drivers doing their best to love’ their energetic prowess.

Calls oxide — did not it? Looks are entirely subjective, and however, also the Rolla is the more attractive one. It’s good for 168 horsepower and 151 lb.-ft. Of torque, and it’s hooked up to either a CVT or a six-speed manual.

Corolla vs. Civic: Which One Should you buy in 2019

NT: Our tester only had to be dark beige–, as Toyota Calls oxide — did not it? Looks are entirely subjective, and however, also the Rolla is the more attractive one. It’s good for 168 horsepower and 151 lb.-ft. Of torque, and it’s hooked up to either a CVT or a six-speed manual.

That’s not a bad thing. Combination; the CVT won’t make the engine assault your eardrums with an excessive drone under hard acceleration, and it lets you wring out the engine — which, by the way, is surprisingly peppy and loves to rev. Especially given the output is low compared to the Civic.

The Civic, at least on paper, has the Corolla beaten. Although the Civic only packs a 1.5L four-cylinder engine, it’s turbocharged and rated at 180 horsepower and 162 lb.-ft. Of torque (though if you stick with the manual transmission, you unlock an extra 15 lb.-ft. for 177 total). Like the Corolla, you could spec the Civic with a CVT or a six-speed stick, but like the Corolla, most will get the automatic. You’d think the Civic is the sporty one here considering its pedigree, but it’s more like a luxury car in the way it puts power to the ground.

JY: It’s not just the way it puts the power to the luxurious ground, it also drives like a larger car. It feels like another size up from the Corolla because of its stretched length and more challenging sightlines, but it also has the smooth, refined ride of a larger car, matched with a more relaxed steering calibration. The Corolla takes a different approach and its more upright greenhouse, and rear windscreen and tighter seats make it feel like it is wrapped around you, and the steering responds more sharply to inputs, while the suspension is a tad firmer, though not uncomfortable. The Civic is perfectly competent and handles better than pretty much any crossover of similar size and price, but the Corolla is more playful, especially when you wind up the zingy little engine.

Staying on the point of the Civic feeling more substantial, well, that’s because it is more extensive, over 10 cm long, with a longer wheelbase and more extensive overall, making for a bit more passenger space, but a lot more cargo space, the Corolla offers a tad over 500 liters, while the Civic is over 700 L. Both are, of course, superior to sedans in terms of practicality, the 60-40 split-folding rear seats aiding in that.

While those cargo compartments are smaller than SUVs with the same footprint, there is also an efficiency advantage, the Civic posting 8.5 L/100 km in our time with it, the Corolla not far back with 8.8. Neither was close to their estimated ratings (7.9/6.6/7.3 for the Civic and 7.5/5.8/6.7 for the Corolla, hatch), but this was in the tail end of winter with Enthusiastic drivers doing their best to love’ their energetic prowess.

Calls oxide — did not it? Looks are entirely subjective, and however, also the Rolla is the more attractive one. It’s good for 168 horsepower and 151 lb.-ft. Of torque, and it’s hooked up to either a CVT or a six-speed manual.

That’s not a bad thing. Combination; the CVT won’t make the engine assault your eardrums with an excessive drone under hard acceleration, and it lets you wring out the engine — which, by the way, is surprisingly peppy and loves to rev. Especially given the output is low compared to the Civic.

The Civic, at least on paper, has the Corolla beaten. Although the Civic only packs a 1.5L four-cylinder engine, it’s turbocharged and rated at 180 horsepower and 162 lb.-ft. Of torque (though if you stick with the manual transmission, you unlock an extra 15 lb.-ft. for 177 total). Like the Corolla, you could spec the Civic with a CVT or a six-speed stick, but like the Corolla, most will get the automatic. You’d think the Civic is the sporty one here considering its pedigree, but it’s more like a luxury car in the way it puts power to the ground.

JY: It’s not just the way it puts the power to the luxurious ground, it also drives like a larger car. It feels like another size up from the Corolla because of its stretched length and more challenging sightlines, but it also has the smooth, refined ride of a larger car, matched with a more relaxed steering calibration. The Corolla takes a different approach and its more upright greenhouse, and rear windscreen and tighter seats make it feel like it is wrapped around you, and the steering responds more sharply to inputs, while the suspension is a tad firmer, though not uncomfortable. The Civic is perfectly competent and handles better than pretty much any crossover of similar size and price, but the Corolla is more playful, especially when you wind up the zingy little engine.

Staying on the point of the Civic feeling more substantial, well, that’s because it is more extensive, over 10 cm long, with a longer wheelbase and more extensive overall, making for a bit more passenger space, but a lot more cargo space, the Corolla offers a tad over 500 liters, while the Civic is over 700 L. Both are, of course, superior to sedans in terms of practicality, the 60-40 split-folding rear seats aiding in that.

While those cargo compartments are smaller than SUVs with the same footprint, there is also an efficiency advantage, the Civic posting 8.5 L/100 km in our time with it, the Corolla not far back with 8.8. Neither was close to their estimated ratings (7.9/6.6/7.3 for the Civic and 7.5/5.8/6.7 for the Corolla, hatch), but this was in the tail end of winter with Enthusiastic drivers doing their best to love’ their energetic prowess.


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